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SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. (BNc) — Observers of American culture have identified in Mozilla CEO Brenden Eich’s sudden resignation signs of growing power on the part of homosexual activists.

Mozilla is the parent company of the popular Firefox browser.

After two weeks as the new CEO, Eich stepped down after homosexuals inside of Mozilla threatened revolt, because of a contribution he had made in 2008 to defeat a same-sex marriage law.

The move has been widely interpreted as a sign of heightened power and activism of same-sex marriage advocates that threatens, by their intolerance, freedom of speech for Americans.

The demand for tolerance has become the Orwellian newspeak of forced submission to liberal causes.

The removal of a corporate CEO is a first in the history of the homosexual movement.

The event sparked such a reaction in many quarters that one long-time broadcaster who always argued against boycotts urged his readers to “Uninstall Firefox.”

In his devotional blog, Bear Valley preacher Neal Pollard wondered if Eich’s forced exit was not a preview of Christian persecution, citing German actions against Jews in 1938.

It raises the question of what homosexual activists really want. Is it merely acceptance and validation or forced approval? If one can lose his job for stating a conviction against that lifestyle, does this suggest a move against the rights of anyone who wishes to articulate belief in the biblical view that homosexuality is a sin? Could this foreshadow a time when those in churches preaching against the practice of homosexuality could lose their property, freedom, or worse?

What should Christians do?

First, American Christians should continue to preach the gospel. Society will be changed insofar as individuals are converted. The moment calls for boldness, rather than timidity, in the face of attempts to silence proclaimers of the truth.

Second, they can support candidates to public office and concerned groups who promote the free exercise of religion and the involvement of Christians in public life. There is no scriptural basis for disobedience to authorities, except when in conflict with the law of Christ, but there is certainly space for activity of citizens to promote justice and liberty in society.

This story was prepared with the use of the Opera and Roccat Internet browsers.

Randal and his wife Vicki have lived and worked in Brazil since Nov. 1984. They have three children, two daughters-in-law, and four grandchildren. He likes to read novels in his back-porch hammock. http://randal.us