Missions support(BNc) — George W. Hall, Executive Director of Biblical Institute of Central America, shows how we can find the funds needed to fulfill the Great Commission, in his October, 2012, report, released today.

Let me suggest that all members 18 years and older be encouraged to commit to start smoking. Then, before they have time to buy their first pack, ask them to change their commitment to missions. Use the $5 per day cigarette money for missions. If you have 200 adults times $5, this results in $1,000 per day. Thirty days in a month equals $30,000 per month for missions. We need to be addicted to and love the lost as smokers do their smokes. The school in Guatemala has 44 students, plus the staff. It operates on less than $20,000 per month. WOW! The school will average graduating 22 per year. Ten years at 22 graduates a year equals 220 lifetime self-supported missionaries in their own culture. The 220 should have about 40 years of service. That’s 8,800 years of service. If they only baptized (with their disciples) 10 per year, we are looking at 88,000 converts. Light ’em up, if you have ’em! Those are members fired up for missions. Anyone want to start a school in Panama, Colombia, etc.?

As affluent Christians, we pretty much buy what we want. We are addicted to material goods. If we had the deep commitment to fulfilling the church’s task, we could do it in a minute. This appears to be Hall’s point.

As it is, we pamper ourselves and our churches and call everything we do missions. We cover up our malfeasance by shouting “temple of the Lord” and think he will approve of our multi-million dollar splurges.

For the people of God who are serious about his work, they will always find plenty of resources, for he is the “blessed and only Sovereign” (1 Timothy 6.15 NET). He is the source of all blessing and has indeed blessed his people with all they need for life in Christ and service to God. “… his divine power has bestowed on us everything necessary for life and godliness” (2 Peter 1.3).

So who’s ready to “light ’em up,” as Hall urges?

Randal and his wife Vicki have lived and worked in Brazil since Nov. 1984. They have three children, two daughters-in-law, and four grandchildren. He likes to read novels in his back-porch hammock. http://randal.us